Summer Term

1. Open Electives

CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

Instructor: Stephanie Burt
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00-3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34505
Limited to 15 students

This course is about writing—and, therefore, reading—many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) "imitation of great masters." It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

This course meets via ...

Read more about CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

Instructor: Ellen Song, PhD
Lecturere on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35052
Limited to 25 students

There was an explosion of works by Asian American authors published around the turn of the millennium, an unexpected consequence of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which brought an influx of immigrants from Asia and dramatically altered the demographic composition of the US. This course examines the many different genres and forms of contemporary Asian American fiction...

Read more about ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

Instructor: Andrew Warren, PhD
Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34817
Limited to 45 students

Writers have long imagined new worlds as a way of changing this one. As Percy Shelley said way back in 1821, creative writers are "the unacknowledged legislators of the world." This course asks how literature depicts and intervenes in the world and models new worlds. It reads works...

Read more about ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

ENGL S-139. England After Empire

Instructor: Duncan E. White, DPhil.
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35056
Limited to 19 students

This course considers the way England was transformed through the demise of its empire after the Second World War through to the advent of Brexit. From the birth of the welfare state to the rise of Thatcherism, from post-colonial migration to multicultural Britain, from the swinging sixties to punk rock and riots, we track these radical political, social, and cultural changes...

Read more about ENGL S-139. England After Empire

ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

Instructor: Lee Damrosch, PhD
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30-11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35000
Limited to 35 students

This course is a study of major eighteenth-century autobiographical, fictional, and philosophical texts that explore the paradoxes of the modern self at a time when traditional religious and philosophical explanations were breaking down. Writers to be read include Mme. de Lafayette, Boswell, Voltaire, Gibbon, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, Franklin, and Blake. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works, such as...

Read more about ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

Instructor: Thomas Wisniewski, PhD
Lecturer on Comparative Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 3:15–6:15pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 33785
Limited to 45 Students

In literature, as in life, humor often takes us by surprise. Why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery, and literary criticism has always been more comfortable dealing with tragedy than comedy. Taking comedy seriously, this course provides a broad investigation into the myriad functions of humor (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and dramatic) and explores why what we find...

Read more about ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

2. Guided Electives 1700-1900

CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

Instructor: Stephanie Burt
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00-3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34505
Limited to 15 students

This course is about writing—and, therefore, reading—many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) "imitation of great masters." It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

This course meets via ...

Read more about CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

Instructor: Ellen Song, PhD
Lecturere on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35052
Limited to 25 students

There was an explosion of works by Asian American authors published around the turn of the millennium, an unexpected consequence of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which brought an influx of immigrants from Asia and dramatically altered the demographic composition of the US. This course examines the many different genres and forms of contemporary Asian American fiction...

Read more about ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

Instructor: Andrew Warren, PhD
Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34817
Limited to 45 students

Writers have long imagined new worlds as a way of changing this one. As Percy Shelley said way back in 1821, creative writers are "the unacknowledged legislators of the world." This course asks how literature depicts and intervenes in the world and models new worlds. It reads works...

Read more about ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

ENGL S-139. England After Empire

Instructor: Duncan E. White, DPhil.
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35056
Limited to 19 students

This course considers the way England was transformed through the demise of its empire after the Second World War through to the advent of Brexit. From the birth of the welfare state to the rise of Thatcherism, from post-colonial migration to multicultural Britain, from the swinging sixties to punk rock and riots, we track these radical political, social, and cultural changes...

Read more about ENGL S-139. England After Empire

ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

Instructor: Lee Damrosch, PhD
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30-11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35000
Limited to 35 students

This course is a study of major eighteenth-century autobiographical, fictional, and philosophical texts that explore the paradoxes of the modern self at a time when traditional religious and philosophical explanations were breaking down. Writers to be read include Mme. de Lafayette, Boswell, Voltaire, Gibbon, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, Franklin, and Blake. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works, such as...

Read more about ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

Instructor: Thomas Wisniewski, PhD
Lecturer on Comparative Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 3:15–6:15pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 33785
Limited to 45 Students

In literature, as in life, humor often takes us by surprise. Why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery, and literary criticism has always been more comfortable dealing with tragedy than comedy. Taking comedy seriously, this course provides a broad investigation into the myriad functions of humor (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and dramatic) and explores why what we find...

Read more about ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

3. Guided Electives 1900-2000

CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

Instructor: Stephanie Burt
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00-3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34505
Limited to 15 students

This course is about writing—and, therefore, reading—many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) "imitation of great masters." It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

This course meets via ...

Read more about CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

Instructor: Ellen Song, PhD
Lecturere on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35052
Limited to 25 students

There was an explosion of works by Asian American authors published around the turn of the millennium, an unexpected consequence of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, which brought an influx of immigrants from Asia and dramatically altered the demographic composition of the US. This course examines the many different genres and forms of contemporary Asian American fiction...

Read more about ENGL S-116. Asian American Genre Fictions

ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

Instructor: Andrew Warren, PhD
Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34817
Limited to 45 students

Writers have long imagined new worlds as a way of changing this one. As Percy Shelley said way back in 1821, creative writers are "the unacknowledged legislators of the world." This course asks how literature depicts and intervenes in the world and models new worlds. It reads works...

Read more about ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

ENGL S-139. England After Empire

Instructor: Duncan E. White, DPhil.
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35056
Limited to 19 students

This course considers the way England was transformed through the demise of its empire after the Second World War through to the advent of Brexit. From the birth of the welfare state to the rise of Thatcherism, from post-colonial migration to multicultural Britain, from the swinging sixties to punk rock and riots, we track these radical political, social, and cultural changes...

Read more about ENGL S-139. England After Empire

ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

Instructor: Lee Damrosch, PhD
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30-11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35000
Limited to 35 students

This course is a study of major eighteenth-century autobiographical, fictional, and philosophical texts that explore the paradoxes of the modern self at a time when traditional religious and philosophical explanations were breaking down. Writers to be read include Mme. de Lafayette, Boswell, Voltaire, Gibbon, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos, Franklin, and Blake. Due to the condensed summer schedule, the longer works, such as...

Read more about ENGL S-141. The Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self

ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

Instructor: Thomas Wisniewski, PhD
Lecturer on Comparative Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 3:15–6:15pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 33785
Limited to 45 Students

In literature, as in life, humor often takes us by surprise. Why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery, and literary criticism has always been more comfortable dealing with tragedy than comedy. Taking comedy seriously, this course provides a broad investigation into the myriad functions of humor (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and dramatic) and explores why what we find...

Read more about ENGL S-185. Wit, Irony, and Comedy

Note: 

All summer courses are administerd by the Harvard Summer School through the Harvard Division of Continuing Education. For any questions about registration, please contact their office directly.