Summer Term

1. Open Electives

ENGL S-117. How to Change the World

Instructor: Andrew Warren, PhD
Associate of the Department of English and Co-Chair, Seminar in Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities, Mahindra Humanities Center
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 34817
Limited to 45 students

Writers have long imagined new worlds as a way of changing this one. As Percy Shelley said way back in 1821, creative writers are "the unacknowledged legislators of the world." This course asks how literature depicts and intervenes in the world and models new worlds. It reads works...

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ENGL S-207. The Culture of Capitalism

Instructor: Martin Puchner, PhD
Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–1:30pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 33124
Open Enrollment

The course asks how literature, theater, and film have captured the spirit of capitalism—fueling its fantasies, contemplating its effects, and chronicling its crises. More than just an economic system, capitalism created new habits of life and mind; it also created new values, forged and distilled by new forms of art. Core readings by...

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ENGL S-238. Indigenous Literatures

Instructor: Rebeccan H. Hogue, PhD
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35355
Limited to 45 students

This course introduces fiction and poetry in a small sampling of the over 1,000 native nations across Turtle Island in North America and Oceania. Thematically, we consider a variety of contemporary issues that impact indigenous story-telling today: environmental and social justice; gender and sexuality; land rights and city life; war and extractive capitalism; and the law...

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ENGL S-257. Superheroes and Power

Instructor: Stephanie Burt, PhD
Professor of English
Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35152
Limited to 50 students

What makes superheroes popular? How can they help us think about power, belonging, queerness, race, citizenship, art, or disability? In this course we explore those questions in Marvel and DC favorites (especially the X-Men) as well as in older literature, independent comics, novels, and readings from several critical disciplines.

 

This course meets on campuus...

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2. Guided Electives Pre-1700

ENGL S-127. Staging Shakespeare

Instructor: Derek Miller, Professor of English
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00–3:00pm (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35368
Limited to 15 students

The plays by William Shakespeare pose serious challenges for actors, directors, designers, and audiences—challenges they must solve in performance. Because Shakespeare's plays have such a long history in the theater, they offer a unique window into ever-evolving performance aesthetics. In staging Shakespeare, artists attempt both to capture what they perceive as Shakespeare's universal achievements and...

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3. Guided Electives 1700-1900

ENGL S-140. The Rise of the Novel

Instructor: Leo Damrosch, Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature, Emeritus
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35352
Open Enrollment

Literary narrative goes back to ancient times, but the novel, as the term is used today, did not appear until the seventeenth century, and only in the eighteenth century did it establish itself as the dominant literary form of our culture. This course explores the eighteenth-century novels long considered the best and most important, both for their achievement in developing the...

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ENGL S-182H. Poetry in America: Whitman and Dickinson

Instructor: Lisa New, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature
Day & Time: On Demand*
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35384
Open Enrollment

This course focuses on the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, two influential and iconic American poets of the nineteenth century. First, we encounter Walt Whitman, a quintessentially American writer whose work continues to bear heavily upon the American poetic tradition. We explore Whitman's relationship to the city, the self, and the body through his life and poetry. Then, we turn to Emily Dickinson, one of...

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4. Guided Electives 1900-2000

ENGL S-139. England After Empire

Instructor: Duncan E. White, DPhil.
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30–11:30am (EDT)
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35056
Limited to 19 students

This course considers the way England was transformed through the demise of its empire after the Second World War through to the advent of Brexit. From the birth of the welfare state to the rise of Thatcherism, from post-colonial migration to multicultural Britain, from the swinging sixties to punk rock and riots, we track these radical political, social, and cultural changes...

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ENGL S-237. Myth and Mystery in Post-World War II US Short Fiction

Instructor: Patrick Whitmarsh, PhD
Lecturer on History and Literature
Day & Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:15–6:15pm (EDT)
Location: Science Center 110
Summer 7-week session | CRN 35390
Open Enrollment

This course surveys a host of short prose fiction published in the United States after 1945. Ranging from canonical works by Thomas Pynchon and Philip Roth to lesser-known works, including several by women and writers of color, this course explores the various ways that authors grapple with political uncertainty, social instability, and cultural...

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Note: 

All summer courses are administerd by the Harvard Summer School through the Harvard Division of Continuing Education. For any questions about registration, please contact their office directly.