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    CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

    Instructor: Stephanie Burt
    Day & Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 12:00-3:00pm (EDT)
    Summer 7-week session | CRN 34505
    Limited to 15 students

    This course is about writing—and, therefore, reading—many kinds of poetry, including brand new open forms, very old rhymed and metered forms, digital native forms, parodies, and (as Yeats put it) "imitation of great masters." It offers a chance to expand the potential for your own writing, taught mostly in workshop format, as well as a way to find models and allies.

    This course meets via ...

    Read more about CREA S-30. Poetry Writing

    English 152kd. Keats Isn't Dead: How We Live Romanticism

    Instructor: Vidyan Ravinthiran
    Monday & Wednesday, 10:30-11:45am | Location: TBA
    Course Website

    Our thoughts and feelings about identity, self-expression, and the power of the imagination draw on the British Romantic poetry of the Long Eighteenth Century--whether we've read any or not. Focusing on John Keats (his key poems, and his key ideas, about 'negative capability', the 'camelion poet', and so on), this course makes unconventional connections into the twentieth, and twenty-first century. Tracking issues of race, class, gender and sexuality, we'll bounce from Keats into war verse; African-American poetries; world/postcolonial writing; the literature of social class; feminist experimentalism; and constructions of masculinity. Concentrators will learn how to analyze poetry in both closed and open forms.

    Note: This course satisfies the English Concentration "Poets" requirement for the Class of 2022; formerly offered as English 58: Poets. 

    English 90kb. Poems of Seamus Heaney and Thomas Hardy

    Instructor: Elaine Scarry
    Thursday, 3:00-5:00 pm | Location: TBA
    Course Website
    Enrollment: Limited to 15 students

    Written a century apart, the poems of Seamus Heaney and Thomas Hardy create an urgent call and response between earth and under-earth. The poets share metrical virtuosity, compressed lyric forms, the unfolding of personal history within public crisis and transformation, and the recognition that the acuity of sentience - the daily practice of exquisitely precise perceptual acts - is the ethical center of our brief stay above ground.

    English 171wp. Who is a Poem?

    Stephanie Burt
    Monday & Wednesday, 10:30-11:45am | Location: TBA
    Course Website

    We'll look at poems, poets, kinds of poems, and their histories by thinking about the people the poems project: how does a piece of writing in verse (or in lyrical prose) work to let us imagine a person behind it, either its author or its character? When does the poem, instead, imagine you? How do poems entice us to care about them, and about the people they project? We'll look at historically major authors, likely with a special focus on Donne, Pope, Hughes, Bishop and Moore, along with contemporary poets including Estes, Hayes and Youn.

    Note: This course satisfies the English Concentration "Poets" requirement for the Class of 2022.... Read more about English 171wp. Who is a Poem?

    English 173bl. The Black Lyric

    Instructor: Tracy K. Smith
    Thursday, 3:00-5:00pm | Location: Sever 107
    Course Website

    African American poets have long embraced the private freedoms of the lyric poem—freedom to claim the authority of an uncontested first person “I”; freedom to wrangle language into new and startling forms; freedom to depart as needed from the strictures of linear reality. And yet, from its earliest iterations, African American poetry has also concerned itself with correcting and complicating the official narrative of Black life and Black subjectivity in America. This course will explore the means by which Black poets have innovated upon the lyric tradition to accommodate a sense of allegiance to a collective. In this tradition, the lyric poem has become a powerful tool with which to ponder the dynamics of self and other, intimate and political—and justice and injustice. Course readings will include work by seminal 20th Century American figures such as Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Hayden and Lucille Clifton, as well as contemporary voices like Jericho Brown, Tyehimba Jess, Morgan Parker, Eve L. Ewing and others. We will also devote attention to lyric corollaries in film, music, visual art and performance. Students will be encouraged to respond to course themes and texts in both critical and creative form.

    Note: This course satisfies the English Concentration "Poets" requirement for the Class of 2022.

    English Cdpr. Devotional Poetry

    Instructor: Josh Bell
    Tuesday, 6:00-8:45pm | Location: Barker 018
    Course Website
    ​​​​​​​Enrollment: limited to 12 students

    In this workshop we will focus on the devotional poetry of John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and GM Hopkins, looking first into certain texts of the Old Testament—Psalms, Song of Solomon, Book of Job—from which so much of devotional poetry extends. In conversation with these four poets, students can expect to build and execute their own plaintive lyric “I,” design new ecstatic/meditative soundscape, and plan and deliver the imagistic configurations that will best give them direct-line access to the God (or gods) of their own choice or invention. As this a poetry workshop, all assignments will be creative.

    Supplemental Application Information: TBA

    Apply via Submittable (deadline: Saturday, January 15 at 11:59pm ET)