Fall Term

Course Information

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1. Creative Writing Workshops
2. Common Ground Courses
English 40gt. Arrivals: British Literature, 700-1700
Instructor: Gordon Teskey

Mondays & Wednesdays, 1-2 pm | Location: TBA

Enrollment: Limited to 27 students.

A survey of major English authors and works from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, including Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur; Middle English ballads and songs; Renaissance lyric poetry from Sir Thomas Wyatt and the Earl of Surrey to Sir Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert and Andrew Marvell; and plays by Shakespeare’s contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and John Webster.

Note: Be sure to attend first class meeting to be considered for admittance.

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3. Undergraduate Seminars
4. Undergraduate Tutorials
5. Lectures with Sections
English 102g. Introduction to Old English: Biblical Literature
Instructor: Daniel Donoghue

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11-12 | Location: TBA

Large portions of the Latin Bible were translated into Old English in the centuries before 1066. Some efforts, like that of Aelfric (10th century), were cautious and painstakingly literal because of the anxiety associated with any departure from the Latin text.

Note: This course, when completed with an honors grade and in combination with English 103g, fulfills the College language requirement and the English Department’s Foreign Literature requirement.

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English 123. Shakespeare, The Early Plays
Instructor: Marjorie Garber

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11 am-12 pm | Location: TBA

The early comedies, tragedies, and histories, considered in the context of the origins of the English stage and the conventions of Elizabethan drama. Particular attention paid to Shakespeare’s development as a dramatist, and to poetic expression, thematic design, stagecraft, and character portrayal in plays.

Note: Formerly AIU 55. 

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English 138. The 18th-Century English Novel
Instructor: Stephen Osadetz

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11-12 | Location: TBA

The rise of the novel, seen through eighteenth-century fiction by Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Jane Austen. Through fiction, we can live out our highest aspirations and blackest fantasies; we can imaginatively enter the minds of others and inhabit strange, sometimes terrifying alternate  realities. The early novel was preoccupied with such possibilities for dislocation and change: what happens when a character ventures far from home, and how can someone rise or fall in the world? Alongside these issues, we will explore the paradoxes of “realism,” the problems of gender and class, and the sheer pleasure of reading fiction.

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6. Graduate Seminars
7. Cross-Listed in other Departments
8. Freshman Seminars